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. . with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. >> i wish to yield one minute to the speaker of the house, the honorable, john boehner. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the speaker. the speaker: let me thank my colleague for yielding and i rise in strong support of h.r. 6604 and commend my colleague, the gentlelady from california, ms. pelosi, for sponsoring this resolution. tip o'neill needs no introduction to this body. those respect and admire tip's record, and his long shadow he cast over the people's house. we all know his best known fame, all politics is local. it's certainly true today as we propose to name a building right here at the foot of capitol hill, a stone's throw from this great dome, in honor the our 55th speaker. this is one of those moments when you wonder how the honoree would feel. especially when it's someone like tip who never quite held back his opinions. perhaps he would have enjoyed seeing leaders from opposite sides of the aisle come together to give him a well deserved hurrah. surely he would have go
, particularly california, is that term limits have not been constructive. the california legislature went from being one of the best in the country to one of the worst rapidly. i believe a mix of experience and new people makes the system work better. we have new people coming into the house in recent years. what is really needed is a recreation of the spirit of compromise, recognizing, as alan simpson said recently, if you don't believe in compromise and you are in politics, you were in the long line of work. host: talk to us about the case of olympia snowe. she wrote an op-ed back in march when she made her announcement that she will no longer be in the senate and talked about why she was leaving and she said some people were surprised by my conclusion yet i have spoken on the floor of the senate for years about the dysfunction and political polarization and the institution. simply put, the senate is not living up to what the founding fathers envisioned. guest: i think senator snowe's statement then was 100% accurate. i have had a chance to talk to senator snowe and i said i was not surprise
member on the energy and commerce committee, the gentleman from california, mr. waxman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much for yielding to me. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the bill. a warmer planet has less ice, higher sea levels, more water in the atmosphere, more powerful storms, more frequent floods, dreier droughts and worse wildfires. two weeks ago hurricane sandy brought a powerful and tragic reminder that the combination of sea level rise and more powerful storms can be deadly, devastating and extremely costly. hurricane sandy was the only -- only the latest and most dramatic in a series of extreme weather events. over the past two years we've had recordbreaking temperatures , the worst drought in 50 years , major floods, numerous tornadoes and thunderstorms and vast wildfires. this is what global warming looks like. and if we continue to ignore it it will soon look far worse. we should be doing all we can to reduce carbon pollution and slow global warming. but this bill instead tries to s
twitter account. first, the program from the commonwealth club in california and th. >> good evening and welcome. i am your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and invite everyone to listen to us online. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. mark feed man is c.e. ofmente and founder of encore.org. an organization working to promote encore careers, second acts for the greater good. he spear headed the experience corp one of the biggest service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize which annually provides five 100,000 dollar prices. >> freedman was described as the voice of aging baby boomers for who are sur suing meaningful and sustaining work for later in life. while the "wall street journal" stated he has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he's the author of "the big shift: navigating the new stage beyond midlife" published in april 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work with a potential to affect our individual lives and collective future. rec
, i know congressman duncan hunter calling from california, he and i are writing a letter. we encouraged our colleagues to sign that letter to the administration, requiring them to comply with the intent of the law. it is unfortunate we have to do that. hopefully we will see some changes in that regard. thank you. >> thank you very much. in march, we are going to hold a jobs fair for veterans. it is interesting. there is an incredible amount of folks that come up. was meeting with franchiser this morning. they have a new initiative to help veterans get inside that business. we are excited by what that means. he mentioned 244,000 claims. do you keep track of the acceptance rate? do you submit them? how often do they make it through the system successfully? >> thank you. it takes so long for them to travel through the system. it is impossible for us to keep an accurate accounting of how many did not. i will tell you that at the board of veterans' appeals, we keep track of the claims that are returned. it breaks down how many claims every year. they did not break them down by the
as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment crews, etc., here into new jersey and new york and connecticut as quickly as possible. and one of the things that we have been able to do, just to give you a sense of how this is an all hands deck approach, we're able to get c-17's, c-130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure in the state. for that we've got emergency generators. we've got a navy ship that has some helicopters that can help to move assets around the state as well. and so we are going to be working with governor christi's office to identify the critical infrastructure and how we can get what's needed as quickly as possible. a couple other things we are concerned about, one is as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure that people can also get to work. obviously there are a lot of folks in jersey who work in new york, in the city, and in other places where transportati
out is that there will be a certain amount of turnover. it is kind of like what happened in california. they just start running for other offices. you know that is one of the reasons the young mayor of los angeles. you know, it does inject a lost talent into positions you would not necessarily think of, but it does create problems because some of the people with seniority expect to be defered to. some of the committees that are not -- let me go through a couple of very important committees where we are not expecting turnover. paul ryan is not going anywhere. he will be the budget chairman again it sounds like. he will ask for a waiver. it is safe to say that will be granted. the appropriations and hal rogers from kentucky who is about as old bull as you can get. old prince of earmarks and reformed nonearmarkers now is staying put. fred upton the chairman of the energy and commerce committee where a lot of health care and energy policy go through. the committee of jurisdiction there will be staying for another two years. and ways and -- any type of entitlement stuff. dave camp. he is n
's funeral in california. to some extent, we are just a big family. >> either of your reached out to the obama girls or could you speculate what it is like at their age to be first children? >> well, the answer is no, because i am not been asked. but the second thing i would say is i think there are goods and bads. one, they do not have to worry about dating. >> yet. >> yeah, but even so, they're still pretty young. susan was in her prime. >> i was. [laughter] >> i was all so -- late bloomer, but i was still in there. so, to some extent, i think some of the young men that i would need would want to go out with the secret service and have nothing to do with me. but the negative part is you would go out with somebody and the next day there would be something in the paper, and the poor fellow just wanted to the movies. you know, he was not proposing. and i am sure it probably hurt him with the other girls he was running around with. but we had the advantage of age and hopefully some judgment. now, the other side for the obama children is that they are young and they're very protected
manufacturing and california. it received some less money to go under. in massachusetts, it was evergreen solar that went bankrupt. to do you think that the government is trying to pick winners and losers in this field? >> i have heard that before. i do not believe in that idea. i believe in a comprehensive policy. the united states is not have that. for a number of things. the renewable energy is -- if you look at an evolutionary process, you always have billion at the start. two point to things life solyndra or the massachusetts failure, there is not a reason to quit. put together a comprehensive renewable energy policy. man sat so in the future we would not have so many failures. -- manage that so in the future we will not have so many failures. >> with that policy include subsidies for electric, batteries for cars? >> i will start to subsidize the renewable energy sector. for 100 years, we have been subsidizing also the o's. we are not close to running out of it. we will run out of them sooner or later. they are polluting. we need to take the money we have been giving a way and say we will
ford's funeral in california. we are a big family. >> have either view reached out out to the obama girls? have you speculated on what it is like to be first children at their age? >> no, because i have not been asked. they do not have to worry about dating. [laughter] even so, they are still pretty young. susan was in her prime. [laughter] i was also. late bloomer, but i was still in there. to some extent, i think some of the young man i would meet would want to talk to secret service and have nothing to do with me. you go out with someone at the next day there'd be something in the papers. the poor fellow disappointed to go to the movies. -- just wanted to go to the movies. we have the advantage of age and some judgment. for the obama children, they are young and very protected by their families. they're not quite out front. i hope they are making lots of friends at the schools they are going to. they seem to be doing it. everything i read, that is all i know. because of the senate connection, once a year the senate spouses have a lunch for the first lady. i had the opportunity to
favorite cable stations, we can't imagine what happens across america from california to new york, from the furthest state going to the north, to our southern friends. including the great state of texas. every morning, every morning some family, some single mother, some single dad, some mother and father rise at 4 or 5 or 6:00 in the morning and on some tables there may be more than one would expect for breakfast, on some tables there is no breakfast. they rush to prepare for the day's work. they rush sometimes to get their children to schools that are far beyond bus stops. and the reason why i say that is, many school districts have even cut out school buses. so that means that these hardworking americans have to rush and get their children to school. and they go off to jobs that are eight, 10, 12 hours long. where they work all day. maybe they had someone, a grandmother or someone, pick up the child, maybe they did not. and therefore they have to either have extended public care or wind up picking up those children, but what i will say to you is that they toil and work every day. so t
former chair of the california democratic party. i do not know what is going to happen there. i believe nancy pelosi will remain and should remain the democratic leader of the house. i do not know that -- i have not heard any talk about a challenge. the last thing the democrats need is an internal squabble. they picked up some seats. the got the white house and the senate. i think there agenda ought to be on moving forward with the issues we have talked about. climate change, immigration reform, and text reform and not internal squabbling. >> our guest is bill press. >> might show is radio and tv. on current tv 3 hours. i will tell you what channel is and is simulcast on progress if talk stations nationwide. if you are lucky enough to have a progressive talk station wyck in madison, wisconsin, you can listen to the show or see it on current tv. host: ron from columbus georgia, independent line. caller: good morning. i do agree with your comment about campaign is over, let's govern. but i am a veteran and i've been a company commander and my point is this, i cannot call my boss and say i
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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